tricking out firefox, part 3

Continuing in my Firefox extensions saga, I’ve got one or two more that I use.

Google Notebook

I admit that when Google Notebook first came out, I didn’t test it out much beyond a casual glance. One of my colleagues, with whom I was working on a paper with, put together a Notebook for us to share within a couple of weeks of its release, but when that particular methodology didn’t pan out, I kind of forgot about Google Notebook. That was until I recently read an article in Wired about someone who did all their work with just a web browser for a month and found himself using Google Notebook instead of del.icio.us. I was a bit curious that anyone would possibly want to replace del.icio.us with anything, so I decided to take another look.

Basically, it is a really simple way to create a list of links with snippets or even very large chunks of text, organize them into notebooks, and then share them, either publicly or with a few invited people. Since I took a second look, I’ve created two Google Notebooks. In reality, I don’t always want to share my del.icio.us account name with people, nor do I necessarily want to clutter up my del.icio.us account with stuff that is for a single project, presentation, or is essentially unrelated to my interests. It’s very easy to do a little web research, highlight whatever you want in a page, click on the Note this button that magically appears if you have it activated in the extension, and start a list of resources. It would be very nice for creating subject resource guides, handouts, and more.

The Firefox extension lets you access your notebooks from within any page–you don’t have to go to the Google Notebook homepage. I wish that there was a bit more that you could do with Google Notebook, like organize sections with headings (you probably can, actually, but I want to do it without creating a “note” for a heading, and so far, I haven’t bothered figuring out how). For now, though, I’ll continue to use it when I want to prep lists of web resources to share.

del.icio.us and del.icio.us complete

Given my obsession with del.icio.us, it’s obvious that del.icio.us would be one of the extensions I’d be using. Right now, I have del.icio.us complete installed in addition to the bookmarklets. Why? Well, I was trying to go back and forth between two accounts, my personal one and a shared one with the med school tech crew. It got annoying really fast, given my virtual dependence on del.icio.us. So, I saw this post about a way to simultaneously post to 2 accounts. I never got it to work, but I am going to try it again when I get my new and hopefully less cranky computer at work. (Has anyone else done this?)

I have been more than a little wary of the new del.icio.us extension. For one thing, I am not a big fan of sidebars. I have precious little screen space on my work computer as it is (I swear, I have the world’s tiniest monitor), but the main reason is that I am a bit scared of doing it after reading so many horror stories on the del.icio.us discussion group. One of these days, I’ll grit my teeth and do it.

Notea

I’ve still got Notea installed in the hopes that one of these days, it will work with Firefox 2.0. It’s an extension designed to work with Connotea–it saves local copies of web pages and PDF files and lets you access said copies via Connotea. Pretty cool in concept, right? Well, here’s keeping my fingers crossed that it works for 2.0 one of these days. CiteULike already does the copy storing thing, so Connotea is kind of behind.

config

Well, this isn’t really an extension, but as a true Firefoxaholic, when I saw a Lifehacker post talking about further customizing Firefox, I took a look and liked what I saw. I’ve done the ones to limit RAM usage, change the tab width, and probably some others.

Others

There are a couple others that I might mention, though I don’t use them myself. The significant other adores Mouse Gestures, and the best friend at work can’t stop talking about NoScript.

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